Creating a Reciprocal Student Exchange Program Agreement

An RSEP Agreement includes a lot of specific information about how the program will work, therefore, the processing time is usually much longer than that of a GIMOU. From inception to completion, RSEP Agreements nearly always take 3 or more months. The timeline can be slowed by extended holidays (here or overseas), complications with translations, slow responses from partner institutions and/or approvers, and the travel schedule of key signatories. It is recommended that a request for an RSEP Agreement be submitted a full year before the expected starting term.

  1. Interest develops between UNL faculty/staff and the partner institution.

    UNL faculty/staff and the partner institution begin to discuss the potential success of a Reciprocal Student Exchange Program by considering factors such as interest-level, language restrictions, course-equivalencies, cost and sustainability.

  2. UNL faculty/staff submit request(s) for agreement(s).

    Any RSEP Agreement should be preceded by, or created simultaneously with, a General International Memorandum of Understanding (GIMOU).

    First, UNL faculty/staff verify whether or not there is a current GIMOU with the partner institution. This can be done by either looking online at the list of current international agreements http://international.unl.edu/current-international-agreements or by contacting the Office of Global Strategies.

    If there is no current GIMOU, then UNL faculty/staff should submit to the Office of Global Strategies:

    Form 1: Request for a General International Memorandum of Understanding and

    Form 2: Request for a Reciprocal Student Exchange (RSEP) Agreement

    If there is already a current GIMOU, then UNL faculty/staff should submit to the Office of Global Strategies:

    Form 2: Request for a Reciprocal Student Exchange (RSEP) Agreement

  3. A RSEP agreement is drafted.

    The Office of Global Strategies works with its counterpart at the partner institution (and often with UNL faculty/staff) to draw up a document that suits the needs of both institutions.

  4. Relevant departments review the RSEP Agreement draft.

    Education Abroad, ISSO, Graduate Studies, Housing, Admissions or other relevant departments review the agreement and clarify the text or request changes. Then, the Office of Global Strategies coordinates with the partner institution to incorporate those changes.

  5. The RSEP is approved by the relevant department(s)/college(s) and vice chancellors.

    The Office of Global Strategies routes the draft to secure approval from relevant Chairs/Heads, Deans/Directors, and the Vice Chancellors of Research & Economic Development, Business and Finance and the Vice Chancellor of IANR or the Sr. Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. Simultaneously, the Office of Global Strategies counterpart routes the draft for the necessary approval at its institution. If changes are necessary, the Office of Global Strategies and its counterpart generate another draft and route it again for approval.

  6. The final document is prepared and signed.

    The Office of Global Strategies prepares the final document, secures the chancellor’s signature and sends the document to the partner for signing. A completed set is returned to the Office of Global Strategies.

  7. The signed document is circulated and filed.

    The Office of Global Strategies scans the fully-signed document and sends it to UNL people who were involved in the processing. The agreement appears on the next updated version of Current International Agreements http://international.unl.edu/current-international-agreements. The original document remains at the Office of Global Strategies.

  8. The Education Abroad Office assists with RSEP implementation.

    A financial account is set up for the exchange and Education Abroad works with the UNL faculty/staff and the partner institution to promote and begin the RSEP.