Visitors gather near the gate rail entrance, of Auschwitz Birkenau
‘Never again:’ Research helps raise impact of Holocaust education

Learning about the Holocaust — the atrocities, as well as the events that preceded it — can instill important lessons on civic engagement, human rights, antisemitism and xenophobia, but how do instructors make the coursework meaningful to their students, beyond just learning the facts? For Gerald Steinacher and Ari Kohen, the question is personal, as Steinacher grew up in a post-World War II Austria near a former concentration camp, and Kohen is the descendant of Holocaust survivors. To help answer it, the two University of Nebraska–Lincoln scholars launched a five-year study, gathering data from Steinacher’s History of the Holocaust course, which he teaches each year to 120-150 students.

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With support from the Office of Research and Economic Development’s COVID-19 Rapid Response Grant Program, Shi-Hua Xiang is in the early stages of developing a bacterial delivery system for a COVID-19 vaccine
Nasal spray could mean needle-free COVID-19 vaccine

As the world eagerly awaits the debut of a COVID-19 vaccine, many of us imagine that receiving the immunization will be similar to getting the flu shot via needle. But Nebraska virologist Shi-Hua Xiang envisions a different approach, one with the potential to involve a little less pain and anxiety, enhanced immunity against COVID-19 and a smaller price tag. With support from the Office of Research and Economic Development’s COVID-19 Rapid Response Grant Program, Xiang is in the early stages of developing a bacterial delivery system for a COVID-19 vaccine that would be delivered directly to the respiratory tract as a nasal spray.

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Jackie Gaughan Multicultural Center
Six Huskers selected to Multicultural Hall of Fame

For outstanding service and dedication to furthering diversity and inclusion, six University of Nebraska–Lincoln alumni have been inducted into the Jackie Gaughan Multicultural Center Hall of Fame. The 2020 class, honored Oct. 29 during a Multicultural Homecoming celebration hosted by the Office of Academic Success and Intercultural Services, includes Chandra C. Díaz, Misty Frazier, Anh Le, Jeannette Eileen Jones, Reshell D. Ray and Shannon Teamer. The induction ceremony was held virtually due to COVID-19 concerns.

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Jordan Stump
UNL French professor earns national recognition for book translation

When it comes to translating, Nebraska French professor Jordan Stump does it mostly on his own, and his wife helps by reading the translation to him while he follows along with the original book. In proof of his renowned translation abilities, Stump was awarded the 2020 National Translation Award in Prose for his translation of “The Cheffe: A Cook’s Novel” by Marie NDiaye.

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A Yazidi woman shows off a large batch of naan, a round, flat, leavened bread.
Project gives voice to refugee population

In August 2014, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) attacked Sinjar Province in northwestern Iraq, killing about 5,000 Yazidi civilians were killed. For some Yazidis who have relocated to Lincoln, Nebraska, other images are helping them deal with their painful past. Julie Tippens, assistant professor of child, youth and family studies, is leading a project to understand how Yazidi women overcome trauma, with the goal of informing programming to improve refugees’ psychosocial well-being. The project is funded by an Office of Research and Economic Development Layman Award and is housed at the Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families and Schools.

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Gary Kebbel (bottom right) leads a panel discussion on the impact of virtual exchange classrooms during the Virtual International Seminar.
Nebraska leads global discussion on leveraging virtual connections in the classroom

In September, Nebraska was one of four institutions to host the Virtual International Seminar along with the University of Nizwa in Oman, Universiti Teknologi Petronas in Malaysia and the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 1,300 people around the world joined the seminar, at which Nebraska presented two sessions on the effect of COVID-19 on U.S. higher education and best practices for virtual exchange classes.

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UNL's Afghan Student Association
UNL's Afghan Student Association returns to campus

Out of 34 international student organizations, one group has been without leadership for 12 years: the Afghan Student Association. In March 2020, this changed. For the first time since 2008, the Afghan Student Association is on UNL’s campus. The club is headed by sisters Sara and Susan Qudus, who serve as president and vice president respectively, along with aid from treasurer Michelle Ebrahim. In AFSA’s constitution, the group promises to unify the Afghan student population of UNL and invites those interested to experience Afghan culture, promoting cultural knowledge through community events.

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Human trafficking stock image
Human trafficking conference goes virtual, expands reach

A shift to a virtual experience expanded the reach of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s 12th annual Interdisciplinary Conference on Human Trafficking. The conference, which took place virtually over the month of October, was inspired by the human trafficking work of Sriyani Tidball, a retired assistant professor of practice in the College of Journalism and Mass Communications. The virtual experience allowed conference organizers to expand the number of presenters and tap into a broader range of experiences. The lineup included two movie screenings and 12 talks by 14 human trafficking experts from around the world.

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Clare Umutoni
Rwandan student learns value of friendship and bravery during pandemic

When Clare Umutoni made the immeasurable move to the United States from Rwanda as an international student in the fall of 2019, she said she expected a rewarding journey full of personal and academic growth. What she didn’t anticipate was living in America during a global pandemic, online classes and a travel ban. Yet thanks to the accommodation of professors and a strong peer network, Umutoni has succeeded and grown as a student in the past year.

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Osler Ortez Amador
Amador drawn to Nebraska for research, diversity

Osler Ortez Amador, a doctoral student in agronomy and crop production, came to Nebraska from his hometown of San Fernando, Nueva Segovia, Nicaragua. After completing his master’s degree, he was looking for an institution with a strong academic and research program in agriculture. After exploring different institutions around the world, Amador found the perfect fit at Nebraska, where he continues to enjoy the diversity of backgrounds among his peers, faculty advisors and the community.

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