Leviathan in Syria: Using Thomas Hobbes to Understand Syrian Civilians’ Alternatives
Global Café to explore human rights issues in Syria

Julia Reilly, lecturer in political science, will give the presentation "Leviathan in Syria: Using Thomas Hobbes to Understand Syrian Civilians’ Alternatives,” from 1 to 2 p.m. Feb. 28 in Oldfather Hall, Room 827. The event, hosted by Global Café, will highlight the principles of human rights.

Read more about this story here.

A new study abroad trip to Australia will focus on natural resources, communications, eco-tourism and the environment. | Courtesy photo
Informational sessions set for new study abroad to Australia

The School of Natural Resources is leading a new study abroad trip to Australia over winter break 2020. The trip, a partnership between Mark Burbach of SNR, and Laura Young, of the Agricultural Leadership, Education & Communication department, will focus on natural resources, communications, eco-tourism and the environment.

Read more about this story here.

Noreen McDonald
Hyde Lecture to explore impacts of travel changes

Noreen McDonald, chair of the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will present the College of Architecture's next Hyde Lecture at 4 p.m. Feb. 28 in the Nebraska Union's Swanson Auditorium. In "Changing Technology, Changing Travel: Thinking About Our Transport Future,” McDonald will discuss technological advances that have given communities new ways to travel, shop and interact. The talk will use health as a lens to explore these changes and identify opportunities to promote equitable mobility.

Read more about this story here.

One of the most iconic World War II photos depicts a Jewish boy surrendering in the Warsaw Ghetto. Samuel D. Kassow will give a lecture March 4 on secret Jewish archives found buried in the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II.
Talk will examine secret archives of WWII Warsaw Ghetto

The Harris Center for Judaic Studies will host Samuel D. Kassow to lecture on the secret archives found buried in the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II. The son of two Holocaust survivors, Kassow was born in a displaced persons camp in Germany in 1946 and his first spoken language was Yiddish. Years after getting his doctorate, he began to research and write about the Holocaust, specifically the Warsaw Ghetto and Polish Jews. This research led him to the hidden archives of the Oyneg Shabes organization — a group of writers, historians and rabbis lead by Emanuel Ringelblum. The lecture, “History and Catastrophe: The Secret Warsaw Ghetto Archive of Emanuel Ringelblum," will be at 7 p.m. March 4 in Love Library South, Room 102.

Read more about this story here.

Global Cafe: Contests of Inclusion: A Comparative Ethnography of Iranians in the U.S. and Canada
Global Cafe to discuss comparative ethnography of Iranians in U.S., Canada

Anthropologist and Iranian diaspora expert Dr. Amy Malek from Princeton University presented her research to the UNL community on Feb. 25 through the Global Cafe series. A sociocultural anthropologist specializing in the intersections of citizenship and cultural production in the Iranian diaspora, she shared her insight on the comparative ethnography of Iranians in the U.S. and Canada.

Read more about this event here.

Archaeological Summer Field School 2020
New: Archaeological Summer Field School to Germany

The Department of Anthropology is excited to announce Dr. Belcher's summer field school to Munster, Germany from June 7th-July 15th. You'll enroll in 6 hours of ANTH 456. Learn more and apply today by March 30th at go.unl.edu/2020-field-school.

Read more about this story here.

Art by Ely Bulnes
Taste of Rwanda event to provide opportunities for food, friendship

Rwandan students at The University of Nebraska-Lincoln will share information about their country with their peers at the first ever Taste of Rwanda event. According to assistant director of Residence Life Jeanne Keyser, Taste of Rwanda will offer attendees the opportunity to build relationships with fellow students while eating Rwandan food and learning about Rwanda and its history. The Residence Life Multicultural and Diversity Education Committee is hosting the event Tuesday, Feb. 25 from 5-7:30 p.m. 

Read more about this story here.

Emma Lentsch
Student Spotlight: Emma Lentsch

Meet Emma Lentsch, a junior studying Global Studies and Political Science at UNL. Discover why she chose her major, what she learned studying abroad in Seville, Spain, and what her future career plans are.

Read more about this story here.

Gus Hurwitz, associate law professor, is director of the Nebraska Governance and Technology Center, a new center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln that aims to explore future implications of technology.
Koch-funded center at UNL set to explore future implications of technology

With the creation of the Nebraska Governance and Technology Center at UNL, approved by the Board of Regents on Feb. 7, Hurwitz wants scholars from "co-equal branches" in the colleges of law, engineering and business to start thinking about the implications of technology on our future.

Read more about this story here.

Nebraska law students work year-round to provide free immigration services to those in need. In recognition for these and other free services it provides, the college was named a 2019 Pro Bono Leader by the American Bar Association.
Achievements | Honors appointments, publications for Feb. 21

The University of Nebraska College of Law was recently named a national Pro Bono Leader by the American Bar Association for the second year in a row. Shideh Yavary Mehr, graduate student in computer science and engineering, also won an award at the Association for Computing Machinery International Conference. Learn more about the honor, and more across campus, in this week's achievements column.

Read more about this story here.

Pages