2019 Impact Stories

Nebraska’s Hiep Vu
Nebraska duo eyes end to costly swine diseases

Two University of Nebraska–Lincoln researchers have received $1 million in grant funding to continue research that could lead to the development of vaccines and genetic-selection tools to fight some of the world’s costliest swine diseases. Huskers Daniel Ciobanu and Hiep Vu have each recently been awarded a three-year, $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. It is the third NIFA grant for each.

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The Pakistani scholars from Nebraska’s English Works! Program celebrate the completion of their two-week program at UNL.
Nebraska and Pakistan exchange comes full circle

The impact of Nebraska faculty and staff can be felt around the world, even thousands of miles away. This October and November, Nebraska played host to 25 scholars from Pakistan through the U.S. Department of State’s English Works! Program.

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Nebraska-Brazil early childhood research partnership continues to thrive

While there are distinct differences between the U.S. and Brazil, there are even more things the two countries have in common. In particular, a desire to ensure all children have the opportunity to reach their full potential guides the work of early childhood educators, researchers and other professionals in both parts of the world. The Nebraska-Brazil Early Childhood Partnership grew from this shared vision. Today, cross-country relationships thrive.

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Since 2005, the University of Nebraska has been excavating the remains of the ancient city of Antiochia ad Cragum, located on the southern Turkish coast.
Hoff receives grant for archaeological research in Turkey

School of Art, Art History & Design Professor of Art History Michael Hoff has received a nearly $200,000 grant from the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Embassy in Ankara for his archaeological research in Turkey. Since 2005, the University of Nebraska has been excavating the remains of the ancient city of Antiochia ad Cragum, located on the southern Turkish coast. This ancient city was founded in the middle of the 1st century A.D. by Antiochus of Commagene, a client-king of Rome. The grant is budgeted over four years and is earmarked for cultural heritage projects. Hoff plans to use the grant to focus on preserving the Roman mosaics they have found at the site. 

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Nebraska's 2018 Mandela Washington Fellows pose after planting a tree on campus in honor of Nelson Mandela's birthday.
Nebraska to host third cohort of Mandela fellows

For the third-straight year, the University of Nebraska–Lincoln has been named an institute partner in the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders program, funded by the U.S. Department of State.

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Rodrigue Mugenga, a Rwandan student, poses for a picture in Love Library on Jan. 28, 2019, in Lincoln, Nebraska.  Photo by Luke Gibbons
CASNR program helps Rwandan students become world agricultural leaders

Before he started college, Rodrigue Mugenga knew he wanted to make a difference and give back to his home country of Rwanda in any way possible. Mugenga, a senior integrated science major at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, discovered and applied for the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources’ Undergraduate Scholarship Program, or CUSP, when it was created in 2015.

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