A Zoom screenshot of 20 UNL students attending the guest lecture by former Irish Prime Minister, Berti Ahern.
New Global Experiences courses offer creative alternatives to study abroad

What better way to learn about conflict resolution than first-hand from one of the architects of Ireland's Good Friday Agreement, former prime minister Berti Ahern? Or to connect with Yazidi culture by growing a garden with the local community? In the new summer course "Negotiating Peace: From Conflict to Coexistence" from the Global Studies program, 14 University of Nebraska-Lincoln students are exploring conflict resolution case studies from two countries in different stages of the process: Ireland and Syria. The courses are part of the new Global Experiences programs, which offer virtual and global-local experiential learning as alternatives to traditional study abroad programs. 

Read more about this story here.

During previous Leadership Institutes, Nebraska’s Mandela Washington Fellows met with Firespring founder and CEO Jay Wilkinson. During the 2021 Institute, Fellows will have a chance to engage with Lincoln professionals through virtual networking.
Nebraska to host virtual leadership institute for Mandela Washington Fellowship

The University of Nebraska–Lincoln has, for the fourth year, been selected as an Institute Partner for the 2021 Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders. Beginning June 21, Nebraska will virtually engage 25 of Africa’s bright, emerging Civic Engagement leaders for a six-week Leadership Institute, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State.

Read more about this story here.

Anamaria Guzman Cardenas in a mirrored dance studio wearing her UNL cap and gown
Cárdenas danced into her own at Nebraska

Anamaría Guzmán Cárdenas isn’t going to box herself in. She never has, and it’s served her well. She’s always followed opportunities that felt right and piqued her curiosity. That’s how, as a high school student in Bogota, Colombia, she followed her intuition to the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

Read more about this story here.

Asian students wearing masks taking a selfie with a phone
Social media discourse significantly drives perception of Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders

While the COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected people from all walks of life in the U.S., the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community have experienced an added share of hardships, according to a recent Nebraska study. A recent analysis by Nebraska researchers of the use of the term “China virus” and other racially charged terms by government officials and the media — and the resulting conversations online — reveals more evidence of social media’s powerful influence on public perception and the potential to stoke racist discourse online.

Read more about this story here.

Stone columns and red flowers
Former faculty member, wife give $1.2M for human rights program

Support for human rights teaching and research programs at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln is behind gifts of more than $1.2 million from Robert “Bob” Hitchcock and Melinda Kelly. The couple has established the Hitchcock Family Chair in Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs as a permanently endowed fund with a $1 million gift to the University of Nebraska Foundation. The chair provides salary, teaching and research support for the director of the Forsythe Family Program on Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs.

Read more about this story here.

Herbie Husker wearing a mask in a graduation cap and gown pointing to a diploma
Virtual international graduation reception is May 7

The University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s fifth annual International Student Graduation Reception will be held virtually at 9:30 a.m. May 7. Hosted each year by the Office of Global Strategies and the Nebraska Alumni Association, the reception will celebrate the accomplishments of all international student graduates who have earned degrees since August 2020. 

Read more about this story here.

Aerial photo of University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus
Behrendt publishes collection of Romantic-era Irish women poets

Cork University Press has published a ground-breaking critical anthology, “Romantic-Era Irish Women Poets in English,” edited by Stephen Behrendt, George Holmes Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. The collection assembles work originally published between 1778 and 1838.

Read more about this story here.

Icons of different religious symbols of various faiths
Student research delves into diversity of faith on campus

Diversity in faiths practiced is increasing in the Lincoln community — and at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. A group of students set out to research the diversity of faiths on campus, attitudes about faith and resources available to practice or worship. Offered through the university’s Undergraduate Creative Activities and Research Experience program, the students, under the advisement of Max Perry Mueller, assistant professor in Classics and Religious Studies, found that there are many different religious backgrounds represented on campus and that respondents are eager to practice their faith on or near campus.

Read more about this story here.

Alex Christensen, Ethan McDermott and Grant Paisley
3 Huskers earn Boren Scholarships

Three University of Nebraska–Lincoln undergraduates — Alex Christensen, Ethan McDermott and Grant Paisley — have earned the Boren Scholarship to study critical languages. The National Security Education Program’s Boren Award provides U.S. undergraduate and graduate students with significant funding to acquire language skills and experiences in countries critical to the future security and stability of the nation. 

Read more about this story here.

Alice Kang
Breaking the glass ceiling: Kang tracking female judicial appointments around the globe

For the past seven years, political scientist Alice Kang has been tracking when and how women broke the glass ceiling to be appointed to the highest courts in democratic countries. Kang, associate professor of political science and ethnic studies at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, teamed up with researchers from Texas A&M University and Arizona State University to research and build a database of judicial appointments of women to courts equivalent to the U.S. Supreme Court in both developing and stable democracies. The scholars also looked at the political factors that preceded the first appointments of these female judges.

Read more about this story here.

Pages